Other Writing

Laura Secor has written about Iran for The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, Foreign Affairs, The New Republic, and other publications, and has worked at The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The American Prospect, and Lingua Franca.

      • War of Words
         
        The New Yorker (Jan 4, 2016)
        A woman’s battle to end stoning and juvenile execution in Iran.
      • Why Is Iran Detaining Jason Rezaian?
        The New Yorker (Aug 15, 2014)
        President Hassan Rouhani is forced to explain exactly why Iran has abducted a law-abiding Washington Post correspondent on what are recognizably trumped-up charges…
      • From Shah to Supreme Leader
        Foreign Affairs (Jan/Feb, 2014)
        There is something irresistible about the story of Iran’s last shah, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi…
      • Talking or Walking
        The New Yorker (Nov 25, 2013)
        A week ago, negotiations in Geneva between Iran and six world powers adjourned without a deal…
      • Why Obama Should Meet Iran’s President
        The New Yorker (Sept 19, 2013)
        The flight from Tehran to New York is long, but if hopes were jet engines Iran’s new President, Hassan Rouhani, would be here already. Rouhani,…
      • Iran’s Choice on Election Day
        The New Yorker (Jun 14, 2013)
        There really is no such thing as a dull election in Iran. This alone is testament to the incurable persistence of dissent, or of fractiousness,…
      • The Iran Syndrome
        The New York Times Book Review (Mar 1, 2013)
        There is much to be said for understanding how the Islamic Republic of Iran sees itself on the international stage…
      • Road Show
        The New Yorker (Oct 8, 2012)
        Last week, after an eight-year run, the Mahmoud Ahmadinejad show closed in New York. The final appearance at the United Nations General Assembly by the…
      • Election, Monitored
        The New Yorker (May 5, 2012)
        On February 29th, two days before parliamentary elections in Iran, I joined a few dozen foreign correspondents—along with official handlers—in the parking lot of the Laleh, a formerly five star….
      • What’s Behind the “Iranian Plot”?
        The New Yorker (Oct 14, 2011)
        For once, the fractious community of Iran experts seems to agree on something: the story of the plot on the Saudi Ambassador’s life is perplexing,…
      • The Iran Show
        The New Yorker (Aug 31, 2009)
        In the grotesque pageant of Iran’s show trials, former high officials—hollow-eyed, dressed in prison pajamas, and flanked by guards in uniform—sit in rows, listening to…
      • An Iranian Journalist Waits for Obama
        The New Yorker (Jul 23, 2009)
        Iranian reporters may not cross certain red lines. They cannot insult the Supreme Leader, question the official version of Islam, or express doubts about the…
      • Behind Iran’s Silence
        The New Yorker (Jul 15, 2009)
        The American attention span for foreign crises is notoriously short. In the two weeks since Iran’s disputed election and the ensuing protests and violence, Michael…
      • Six Essential Books on Iran
        The New Yorker (Jun 26, 2009)
        This week in the magazine, Laura Secor, who is a contributor and is working on a book about Iran, wrote a Comment about Mir-Hossein Moussavi…
      • Burning Silence in Iran
        The New Yorker (Jun 24, 2009)
        Silence seems to have rolled over Iran’s burning landscape, not because the situation has calmed, but because we know it less and less. Reporters have…
      • The Protest Vote
        The New Yorker (Jun 22, 2009)
        More than a hundred Iranian reformists have been arrested in the turmoil following Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s hastily declared victory in the June 12th Presidential election. Among…
      • Fighting Over the Revolution
        The New Yorker (Jun 20, 2009)
        The footage from Tehran today looks like urban warfare. Gone are the massive crowds. Instead we see bands of civilians under attack from bands of…
      • Optimism and Anger in Tehran
        The New Yorker (Jun 17, 2009)
        At long last, a dear friend reached me by phone from Tehran yesterday. I had been trying to get hold of her for days, but…
      • The Supreme Leader’s Next Move
        The New Yorker (Jun 16, 2009)
        Today begins with seemingly contradictory news from Iran: the Guardian Council, a body of clerics that holds more power than the President or the parliament,…
      • Tehran Updates
        The New Yorker (Jun 15, 2009)
        I just spoke to a trusted Iranian source based in Canada. He tells me that 3,400 Iranian expatriates voted in Ottawa. It took the volunteers…
      • Why Tehran Matters
        The New Yorker (Jun 15, 2009)
        The Iranian blogosphere, Facebook, and indispensable English-language Web sites like Tehran Bureau and NIAC Insight are streaming with video footage of chaos in the streets…
      • The Iranian Vote
        The New Yorker (Jun 13, 2009)
        At the Grand Hyatt Hotel in midtown Manhattan on Friday, a decorous LCD placard outside a ballroom—the sort that might have announced the name of…
      • Charm Offensive
        The New Republic (Apr 1, 2009)
        You could almost hear the international sigh of relief that greeted President Obama’s videotaped message to Iran last week…
      • Khatami’s Climb
        The New Yorker (Feb 10, 2009)
        Former President Mohammad Khatami, the leader of Iran’s movement for internal reform, has announced his candidacy in the June, 2009 presidential election. He’ll be facing…
      • The Rationalist
        The New Yorker (Jan 26, 2009)
        Not long ago, I visited the office of a financial consulting firm on a quiet dead-end street just north of the commercial center of Tehran.…
      • Keep Away
        The New Republic (Apr 23, 2007)
        It was twilight for the reform era, with President Mohammed Khatamiin, his ineffectual final year  and a hard-line resurgence taking shape on the horizon…
      • Whose Iran?
        The New York Times Magazine (Jan 28, 2007)
        The Mahestan mall in South Tehran is sometimes called “the honeycomb” of the Basij, the Iranian youth militia, because it is here that Basijis, as the militia members are known, buy and sell banners…
      • Fugitives
        The New Yorker (Nov 14, 2005)
        One afternoon in June, three days before Iran’s Presidential elections, thousands of young reformists gathered in Tehran University’s soccer stadium. Their candidate, Mustafa Moin, was…